Sau-ling Cynthia Wong

Sau-ling C. Wong

Professor Emerita

slwong@berkeley.edu
588 Barrows
Office hours: TBA

Education

  • Ph.D., British and American Literature, Stanford University, 1978
  • M.A., Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language, SFSU, 1980
  • B.A., English and American Literature, summa cum laude, Indiana University, 1970

Research interests

Anglophone and Sinophone Chinese American literatures; the Chinese diaspora; immigrant writing and film; transnational reception studies. Asian American literature: transnationality, globalization, and mobility; gender and sexuality; canon formation

Selected publications

Books

  • Cong bixu dao shechi: Jiedu yayi meiguo wenxue [Chinese translation of Reading Asian American Literature: From Necessity to Extravagance; see below]. Trans. Zhan Qiao, Pu Ruoqian and Li Yaping. Beijing: Zhongguo shehui kexue chubanshe [Chinese Social Science Publishing House, 2007]
  • Rachel Lee and Sau-ling C. Wong (eds.), AsianAmerica.net: Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Cyberspace (New York: Routledge, 2003)
  • Sandra L. McKay and Sau-ling C. Wong (eds.), New Immigrants in the United States: Readings for Second Language Educators (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000)
  • Sau-ling C. Wong and Stephen H. Sumida (eds.), A Resource Guide to Asian American Literature (New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2001)
  • (Ed.) Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior: A Casebook (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999). Casebooks in Contemporary Fiction Series, ed. William L. Andrews

  • Reading Asian American Literature: From Necessity to Extravagance (Princeton: Princeton Univ.Press, 1993)
  • With Sandra Lee McKay (eds.), Language Diversity: Problem or Resource? A Social and Educational Perspective on Language Minorities in the United States (Cambridge, Mass: Newbury House Publishers, 1988)

Recent Articles and Book Chapters

  • Forthcoming. “Global Vision and Locatedness: ‘World Literature in Chinese/by the Chinese’ (Shijie huawen/huaren wenxue) from a Chinese Americanist Perspective.” Ed. Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang. Leiden and Boston: Brill Press
  • Forthcoming. “Dancing in the Diaspora: ‘Cultural Long-Distance Nationalism’ and the Staging of Chineseness by San Francisco’s Chinese Folk Dance Association.” Journal of Transnational American Studies [online journal], 2 (2009)
  • “Circuits/Cycles of Desire: Buddhism, Diaspora Theory, and Identity Politics in Russell Leong’s Phoenix Eyes,” New Asian American Writers and News from UK, Italy and Asia: Literature and the Visual Arts. Vol. 1. Ed. with an Introduction by Lina Unali. 2006 [an ebook], pp. 7-25
  • [In Chinese] “Yellow and Black: African-Americans in Sinophone Chinese American Literature,” in Zhongwai Wenxue (Chung Wai Literary Monthly) 34.4 (2005), ed. by Te-hsing Shan. pp. 15-54
  • “Maxine Hong Kingston in a Global Frame: Reception, Institutional Mediation, and ‘World Literature,'” in AALA [Journal Asian American Literature Association of Japan] 11 (December 2005), pp. 1-35

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